Scientist, Author, Educator, Tree Canopy Biologist

Featured Video

In a Google Science Fair Hangout On Air conversation with editor-in-chief of Scientific American, Mariette DiChristina, Dr. Lowman discusses how she became fascinated with what is happening at the tops of trees, what kinds of studies she has done on her treetop walkways, and more.

New Book

treetops-at-riskTreetops at Risk
Challenges of Global Canopy Ecology and Conservation
Lowman, Margaret; Devy, Soubadra; Ganesh, T. (Eds.)
2013, XIX, 444 p. 100 illus., 78 illus. in color.

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  • Uses the major findings of the 5th International Canopy Conference as a platform for organization
  • Assembles a global authorship to examine past accomplishments and future initiatives critical in forest conservation
  • Presents articles that represent future priorities and advancements for canopy science in the next decade

Featured Project

CanopyMeg and TREE Foundation are working to conserve the Church Forests of Ethiopia, but we need your help!

This unique opportunity not only reduces your carbon footprint, but also saves biodiversity, fresh water, natural medicines, pollinators, and insures the future spiritual heritage of an African nation. Read more.

Current Projects

The Nature Research Center

TREE Foundation

REU Canopy Explorers

Sloth Conservation

Out on a Limb - Forest Canopies

Base Camp Sarasota

Canopy Walkway Construction

Books, Publications and Column

Dr. Lowman has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications and several books including Life in the Treetops, It’s a Jungle Up There, and Methods in Forest Research.

Dr. Lowman’s column Nature’s Secrets can be found in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune and The News & Observer.

CanopyMeg Twitter Feed

@canopymeg
Tree canopy biologist, educator, ecologist, writer, editor, public speaker and currently Chief of Science & Sustainability at California Academy of Sciences.
  • Imagination is more important than knowledge. — Albert Einstein The era of “citizen spies” is upon us! “CSI:... http://t.co/ERP8Y5hL85
  • “Well behaved women rarely make history.” — Laurel Thatcher Ulrich Thankfully, things have changed in the world... http://t.co/NzzzqRDtoM
  • Life at the top! @mongabay Rhett Butler climbs trees @calacademy! Biodiversity rocks! http://t.co/setI9A8SGR
  • A new comment in the journal Nature argues that conservation’s impact on the world is being hindered by the... http://t.co/MfDtUnlkU1
  • Congratulations to my undergraduates from our NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates grant “Wheelchairs and... http://t.co/Gsv2JqWmRv

Latest Posts

  • Nature's Secrets by CanopyMeg
    New ‘spies’ for science
    Imagination is more important than knowledge. — Albert Einstein The era of “citizen spies” is upon us! “CSI: Miami,” take note. Many conservation biologists, geologists, public health specialists and nonprofits are building up a new army, called UAVs (Unmanned aerial vehicles) or “drones,” which are low-cost...
    Read more
  • Nature's Secrets by CanopyMeg
    How to raise a girl scientist
    “Well behaved women rarely make history.” — Laurel Thatcher Ulrich Thankfully, things have changed in the world of science since brave and bold Marie Curie was the sole female in many auspicious occasions. But approximately 51 percent of the world’s population is female and far too...
    Read more
  • A call for inclusive conservation
    A call for inclusive conservation
    A new comment in the journal Nature argues that conservation’s impact on the world is being hindered by the field’s lack of inclusiveness — particularly its failure to consistently include both the many different values people hold for nature, and the viewpoints of women and diverse ethnicities and cultures....
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  • Tardigrades publication by NSF undergraduates involved in the "Wheelchairs and Water Bears in Temperate Forest Canopies" program
    Tardigrades publication by NSF undergraduates involved in the “Wheelchairs and Water Bears in Temperate Forest Canopies” program
    Congratulations to my undergraduates from our NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates grant “Wheelchairs and Water Bears in Temperate Forest Canopies” for their first publication! This article describes a new species of tardigrade from the trees of Kansas, illustrating that discoveries are everywhere, even in our...
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  • Citizen Science Network iNaturalist Celebrates Millionth Nature Observation as it Launches New Visual Maps
    Citizen Science Network iNaturalist Celebrates Millionth Nature Observation as it Launches New Visual Maps
    The California Academy of Sciences’ naturalist social network gets major revamp SAN FRANCISCO (November 10, 2014) — This week, iNaturalist.org—the California Academy of Sciences’ online social network for naturalists—launched a new series of easy-to-navigate maps that connect people with the natural world like never before. This...
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